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At this time, NEIB at Cambridge College is not enrolling new students in AS or DBA programs while the appropriate approvals and authorizations are obtained.
At this time, NEIB at Cambridge College is not enrolling new students in AS or DBA programs while the appropriate approvals and authorizations are obtained.

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

NEIB generally uses course designations as follows:

  • 100-level courses correspond with freshman-level courses,
  • 200-level courses correspond with sophomore-level courses,
  • 300-level courses correspond with junior-level courses,
  • 400-level courses correspond with senior-level courses, and
  • 500 level courses are master’s level and require a Bachelor’s degree as an admissions requirement.
General Education Course Descriptions

ART 301
Art History and Appreciation
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

This course examines the meaning, purpose, function, and classification of art and architecture. The course assesses visual elements and principles of design necessary for creating art and the materials and techniques employed in making two and three dimensional artworks. The course covers art-specific vocabulary, methods of interpretation of art and major artistic and architectural achievements in the history of Western culture. Students will examine well-known works of art and architecture through the study of content, technique, form and purpose as they relate to art and architecture. Students will learn to apply critical thinking in assessing, evaluating and debating the artistic techniques and skills utilized to produce enduring works of art and architecture.

CAEL 100
Prior Learning Assessment Theory and Practice
3 credits

Prerequisite: None

Prior learning assessment (PLA) is the process of earning college credit for learning that was acquired from non-classroom experiences like work, professional training, military careers, volunteering, and personal life. CAEL100 will help students identify areas of learning they may want to have evaluated for college-level equivalency. The course will also guide students through the preparation and compilation of all components required for the evaluation of a portfolio or prior learning through LearningCounts.org. Students will use critical reflection skills to rethink the value of their learning and its implications for future learning. Adult learning theory, models, and concepts will be discussed and applied to case studies. CAEL 100 is facilitated by an instructor who provides guidance for the student in preparing his or her portfolio-based request for credit.

COM 201 Business Writing and Communication 3 credits

Prerequisite: None

Business Writing and Communication is designed to help students understand the communication process in both personal and workplace settings. Content is organized to aid in the development of clear, concise, practical, and ethical business and real world communication pieces. Students walk through a case study to practice applying the skills of business writing and in the process utilize and select appropriate channels for communication, including email, memo, letters, reports, PowerPoint, websites, press releases and social media channels.

COM 301
Interpersonal & Organizational Communication
3 credits

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to examine how we perceive self and others, how we use information we gather about self and others to guide our interactions, and the essential role of communication in the development and maintenance of human relationships. The goal of this course is to provide students with a better understanding of some of the factors affecting communication in relationships and to appreciate the impact of communication on our relational lives. In this course, students will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of human communication processes and learn strategies to improve interpersonal communication skills.

COM 401
Intercultural Communications
3 credits

Prerequisite: None

In a globalized world where different cultures continuously intersect, understanding intercultural communication has become vital for both everyday life and for business interactions. This course will explore the dynamics of cross cultural communication and the meaning of cultural identity and its undercurrents. The course will demonstrate how to be inclusive of others through encouraging cultural sensitization, and will show how to creatively address miscommunication obstacles. We will discuss the challenges that face multi-national corporations when working in and with different cultures. We will be watching videos and reading stories and discussing scenarios of different cultures, thinking of our own prejudices and pre-determined misconceptions. By the end of the course we will be able to recognize cultural differences in body language and other cultural tell-tales that could help students engage in cross-cultural communication.

ECO 101
Economics and Society
3 credits

Prerequisite: None

This course emphasizes how events and developments in the economy can affect the market and financial decisions of business. The course provides students with an overview of the fundamental concepts and theories related to economic development from the Middle Ages to the Twenty-First Century. Students will learn a balanced perspective on how the economy has developed and how that economy influences society and how society influences the economy. The course explores and analyzes the role of past economic trends and dynamics and employment and income inequalities that continue to challenge global society, market economies, and governments, especially our own. Students will also learn key terminology, elements of business from an economic viewpoint, and how to illustrate economic principles and elements of business from an economic viewpoint.

ECO 201
Macroeconomics
3 credits

Prerequisite: None

This is a three credit course which will develop a working knowledge of the principle concepts and theories in macroeconomics. In this day of rapid and dynamic change, economic issues underlie much of the political, social, cultural and military turmoil throughout the world. In this course, economic theory and analysis are related to the world reality. Thus, the student can apply what is being learned to assist in making prudent judgments regarding various current economic issues, even though they may have social and political overtones.

ECO 202
Microeconomics
3 credits

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to develop a working knowledge of the principle concepts and theories in microeconomics. This part of economics is concerned with the interrelationships of the individual business firms, industries, consumers, laborers, and other factors of production that make up a modern economy. This course involves three main elements:

  • How the private interests of the countless individuals who constitute a modern economy are related to the economic interests of society as a whole.
  • The theory of pure competition from the point of view of its overall structure questioning interdependence and efficiency.
  • The applicability of theoretical structure to modern industrial realities.

ENG 099
Fundamentals of English
3 credits

Prerequisite: Entrance/Placement Exam. Successful completion of this course with a grade of ‘C’ or better is required in order to move forward in the undergraduate program.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation in grammar, writing and essay techniques. Students will identify parts of speech and learn to write effective and grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs. Students will learn and apply the steps of the writing process through the use of various materials including exercises from www.mywritinglab.com. Students will learn about proper writing style, pattern types, as well as strategies and guidelines for writing an effective essay.

Please note: This is a pre-college-level course and does not award credit that can count toward graduation requirements.

ENG 101
English Composition I
3 credits

Prerequisite: Placement Exam; Pass Fundamentals of English with a C or higher; or Permission of the College

This purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation in writing and research techniques. Students will learn and apply the steps of the writing process. They will identify essay components and learn to write effective and grammatically correct paragraphs. Writing style, pattern types, as well as strategies and guidelines for writing an effective research paper will be evaluated. Students will write an effective and grammatically correct research paper as a final project in this course.

ENG 201
English Composition II
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG101 English Composition I

The purpose of this course is to build upon writing and research skills learned in English Composition I. Students will apply research strategies and methods for finding information and apply the steps of the writing process and appropriate research and citation methods to write research essays and papers. Students will learn to further utilize the APA Style in writing research essays and papers.

ENG 305
American Literature
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

This course examines the evolution of American literature from the early 1800’s to our present era. It covers a variety of literary genres and the use of Literary Criticism to articulate aspects of those genres. Students will read a variety of literary works in American literature from the 19th Century to the 21st Century and will demonstrate abilities to read and analyze works as well as their own performances in the various aspects of the course. Students will read works of American authors such as Poe, Irving, , Whitman, Wharton, O’Neill, Hughes, Fitzgerald, Williams, Lowell, Plath and Sexton as well as culturally diverse American writers like Morrison and Anzaldúa. Students will be engaged on a variety of levels and will learn to analyze and critically evaluate a wide range of ideas and points of view found in the literature that will be studied. Students will be expected to participate in the various aspects of the course such as reading assignments, online discussions, written assignments, a research paper and quizzes.

ENG 405
British Literature
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

This course examines English Literature along with its cultural and historical contexts from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings through the Twentieth Century. The course includes the reading and study of literary works such as poetry, dramas, short stories and novels written by prominent English authors. The course is designed to actively engage students by deepening their appreciation of style, structure and themes in literature while examining the creative process and use of figurative language in crafting selected literary works in English Literature.

HIS 201
US History Since 1900
3 credits

Prerequisites: ENG201 English Composition II

This U.S. history course is centered upon the belief that historical events have social, economic and political consequences. The emphasis of the course relates to the relationship among historical events rather than simply a chronological study of isolated events or people. The scope and sequence of the course is designed to highlight themes, processes, and causal relationships between events in order to communicate that history is a process of continuity as well as change. Utilizing this approach will result in an increased ability to recognize and analyze the connection between historical events and present circumstances and conditions. The National Council of the Social Studies (NCSS) validates the thematic approach through its own ten thematic strands of social studies and the goal of “adopting common and multiple perspectives” on historical events.

INF 101
Information Literacy for College Success
3 credits

Prerequisite: None but Required as First Course in All Undergraduate Programs

The purpose of this introductory course is to prepare students to be an online learner and an information literate individual in a technological world. The course provides an understanding of NEIB’s learning technologies, support services, and necessary skills for online student success. The primary function of this course is to provide students with the necessary skills of Information Literacy which prepare students to recognize what information is needed, when it is needed and how to locate, evaluate and use it effectively. Extensive practice in using the NEIB eLibrary databases is integral in learning to be an information literate student at NEIB. The course content aligns with the national standards as established by the American Library Association and the Association of College & Research Libraries.

MAT 099
Fundamentals of Math
3 credits

Prerequisite: Entrance/Placement Exam. Successful completion of this course with a grade of ‘C’ or better is required in order to move forward in the undergraduate program.

This course focuses on concepts and applications of arithmetic, including whole numbers, fractions, ratios, proportions, the decimal system, and percents. Brief introductions to algebra, formulas, algebraic expressions, and linear equations are also included. Special emphasis is placed on the application of basic math skills to common workplace problems and real-life situations.

Students may be required to take MAT 099 based on the Math placement test and prior to registering for MAT 103 Business Mathematics and/or MAT 105 College Algebra. Students must pass Fundamentals of Math with a “C” or higher before enrolling in college level math courses.

Please note: This is a pre-college-level course and does not award credit that can count toward graduation requirements.

MAT 103
Business Mathematics
3 credits

Prerequisite: Placement Exam; Pass Fundamentals of Mathematics with a C or Higher, or Permission of the College

This course applies math fundamentals to business applications. Topics include a basic math review, business statistics, profit calculations, payroll, banking, interest calculations, insurance, taxes, and other business topics.

MAT 205
College Algebra
3 credits

Prerequisite: None; Business Math Strongly Recommended

This course focuses on algebraic concepts essential for success in the workplace and other courses. Using real-world examples and applications, students practice fundamental operations with number systems, formulas, algebraic expressions, and linear equations. This course also explores problems involving factoring, inequalities, exponents, radicals, linear equations, functions, quadratic equations, and graphs.

MAT 305
Statistics
3 credits

Prerequisite: MAT205 College Algebra or equivalent

This course covers basic statistical concepts and theories, as well as the application of statistical methods. The topics include the collection, organization, summary and description of data, basic probability theories, normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing techniques, and regression-correlation analysis.

PHI 101
Critical Thinking
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

The purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of the art and discipline of critical thinking. Students will learn the various critical thinking standards and concepts including effective critical thinking, problem solving, logical reasoning, comparative reasoning, issue analysis and the application of critical thinking standards and strategies to determine and solve practical and theoretical problems. Students will explore the application of critical thinking concepts to real world situations in an effort to understand the critical thinking process. They will develop an ability to critically analyze the formulation and posing of questions to promote well-reasoned arguments on a variety of important topics.

POL 250
Political Science
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction to the academic discipline known as political science. This course presents students with a broad overview of key components of political science. Many subfields of political science exist, and this course will not go into them but instead focus on how political science shapes political, economic and social relationships in the United States. As you are well aware, a variety of political perspectives inform how we participate in the United States. You are encouraged to critically examine how these relationships develop. The weekly discussions allow for students to engage with people from a variety of viewpoints and help each other identify the principles that underpin different political viewpoints in the United States.

PSY 250
Psychology
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

The purpose of this course is to introduce human behavior. It includes the study of the theories and concepts of psychology including the scope of psychology, biological foundations and the brain, sensation, perception, motivation, personality, learning/memory, emotion, states of consciousness, personality theories, cognition, life-span development, and applied psychology.

SCI 280
Environmental Science and Lab
4 credits

Prerequisites: None

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of how the natural world works, how it affects us as humans and how we influence it. Through this study students will increase their understanding of the major environmental issues impacting the world today and our future generations.

SCI 301
Anatomy and Physiology
3 credits

Prerequisites: None

This course provides the student with a comprehensive examination of the human body. Emphasis is on how the body is organized, its support and maintenance system, control and continuity. The course is a survey of the structure and function of the human organ systems.

SOC 250
Sociology
3 credits

Prerequisite: ENG201 English Composition II

This course is designed to give students a basic introduction to the academic discipline of sociology. This course presents students with a broad overview of key components of sociological theory in selected subfields. This course focuses on how social structures create norms and values that are shaped by an individual’s historical and biographical narrative. As you are well aware, a variety of social perspectives inform how we participate in social structures. You are encouraged to critically examine how norms and values shape this participation. The weekly discussions allow students to engage with people from a variety of viewpoints and help each other identify the principles that underpin different sociological theories. The weekly assignments allow students to engage in each week’s topic with more detail and receive feedback on how well the material is integrated in the answer to the assignment question.

Core Business Course Descriptions

ACC 201
Accounting I
3 credits

Prerequisite: None; MAT103 Business Mathematics Strongly Recommended

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop a basic understanding of fundamental accounting concepts and practices. The course focuses on basic accounting concepts and techniques needed to interpret and use financial information in managing and analyzing business operations.

ACC 202
Accounting II
3 credits

Prerequisite: ACC 201 Accounting I

Students will continue to develop a basic understanding of fundamental accounting concepts and practices. Students will also be introduced to fundamental managerial accounting concepts and practices and will learn to interpret and use internal financial information in the management and analysis of business operations.

ACC 203
Financial Statements for Managers
3 credits

Prerequisites: ACC 201 Accounting I; ACC202 Accounting II Strongly Recommended

This online course will enable the student to understand and apply the fundamental tools necessary to effectively analyze a business’ financial condition. The financial analysis process is approached from an analyst’s point of view. You will learn how to determine the composition and quality of financial statement information; how to analyze the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement, and reconciliation and retained earnings statement; how to spread statements to ensure efficient and consistent financial statement analysis; how to calculate and apply commonly used ratios, including industry comparables, to assess a business’ financial condition and determine its capacity to repay debt.

ACC 205
Managerial/Cost Accounting I
3 credits

Prerequisites: ACC201 Accounting I; ACC202 Accounting II Strongly Recommended

Managerial Accounting will focus on providing information to managers, those inside an organization who direct and control a company’s operations. In contrast, financial accounting [Accounting I and II and Intermediate Accounting] is concerned with providing information to stockholders, creditors, and others who are outside an organization. Managerial Accounting provides the essentials that are needed to run organizations. We will reinforce previously learned concepts and consider the same concepts in practical applications. Subjects will include some familiar topics and some unfamiliar topics. Course objective is to look at accounting from the manager‘s perspective rather than the practicing accountant perspective and to focus on cost, cost analysis and costing systems, including budgeting and to enable managers to manage more effectively.

ACC 206
Accounting Information Systems
3 credits

Prerequisites: ACC202 Accounting II or Permission of the College

The Accounting Information Systems course is designed to help the student understand and identify key concepts and components to an accounting information system, including information data flow, information system architecture, business continuity, and roles of accountants within the information system. Additionally, accounting software systems will be examined.

ACC 301
Intermediate Accounting
3 credits

Prerequisites: ACC202 Accounting II or Permission of the College

Intermediate accounting introduces students to a more in depth examination of accounting theory. The major areas covered in this course include the role of accounting as an information system, and economic resources. Finally, the key differences between U.S. GAAP and Internation